Fig Leaf Ice Cream

 

120g               milk powder

700g               sucrose

300g               glucose atomized

15g                 stablizer

2700g            milk

1500g            cream

200g               sucrose

200g               dried figs cut in quarters

10                   fig leaves torn up into small pieces, stems removed

500g               egg yolk

 

  1. Place milk powder, 700g sucrose, glucose, and stabilizer in a bowl and mix until even. Set aside.
  2. Place the milk, cream, and dried figs in a large pot and place over medium high heat.
  3. While the dairy is coming to a boil, place the fig leaves and 200g sucrose in the food processor and pulse until the fig leaf is broken up very small. Add the fig leaf sugar to the pot with the dairy, and whisk to dissolve. Continue cooking until the dairy boils, then remove from heat and steep for 1 hour.
  4. After 1 hour, strain the fig leaf dairy, and place in clean pot. Bring the fig leaf cream to a rolling boil, When the dairy begins to boil, remove from heat, then temper a small amount of the hot dairy with the yolks. Add the tempered yolks back to the pot with the dairy and whisk to combine evenly. The residual heat should be enough to thicken the yolks. If not, place the pot over medium low heat and cook, stirring with a rubber spatula, until the custard thickens.
  5. Immediately strained into a large bowl, and transfer the bowl to an ice bath. Chill, then transfer to a cambro for storage overnight before spinning.

One Response to “Fig Leaf Ice Cream”

  1. Aaron

    No comment on how fig leaves taste like coconuts? It’s like all I get when I smell them – maybe you got a different variety but next time you are around a fig tree – especially in the spring, crush and smell a leaf and think coconuts – it will shock you!

    Reply

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